Do Christians Worship Three Gods?

Do Christians worship three gods? Skeptics insist they do. Religious organizations like Unitarians and Jehovah’s Witnesses lay the same charge. The word Trinity is baffling to them.

At the same time some Christians are vague about what Trinity means because it seems mysterious. Mysterious indeed: God reveals himself first as one God, and, at the same time, as three Persons in one Godhead.

Nearly all bodies of Christendom subscribe to this doctrine of the Trinity — Greek Orthodox, Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican, United Methodists, Assemblies of God, and on and on. One source says 47 of 50 major denominations identified do so.

How is the claim supported in Scripture?

Moses was living in a world that reeked with many gods when God addressed him at the burning bush (Exodus 3). But Moses did not ask, “Which god of the many is this now?” From the beginning, God revealed to him that there was only one true God.

Listen to the Shema, the Jewish statement of faith found in the Old Testament that is recited at morning and evening prayer every day: “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one” (Deuteronomy 6:4). In that ancient world, teeming with gods, the Old Testament names Jehovah as “the Sovereign LORD” (Habakkuk 3:19).

The New Testament continues the claim. During Jesus’ forty-day fast, Satan tried to entice him to bow down and worship him. Jesus’ response: “It is written, ‘Worship the LORD your God and serve him only’” (Luke 4:8). God is one.

At the same time, the Scriptures show that the One God manifests himself in three persons, and this reality is repeatedly set forth.

After the resurrection, Thomas worshiped Jesus as the risen Savior, exclaiming, “My Lord and my God.” If this exclamation had been false, but Jesus had accepted it anyway, Jesus would have committed blasphemy.

Later the Apostle John reinforces the declaration of Thomas. In the prologue to his gospel he testifies of Jesus as follows: “the Word (Jesus) was God” (John 1:1).

But what about the Holy Spirit? In the New Testament Church, when a couple named Ananias and Sapphira tried to deceive Peter over a money gift, Peter saw through their ruse. He said to Ananias, “you have lied to the Holy Spirit” (Acts 5:3). Then he added, “You have not lied to men but to God” (Acts 5:4).

It is impossible to lie to a mere feeling or sensation. The Holy Spirit is instead a person. He is a “person” of the Godhead. He is God the Spirit. Jesus helps us understand the Holy Spirit’s purpose by calling Him the Paraclete (counselor).

At his baptism, Jesus “saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove” and heard the voice of the Father saying, “This is my Son whom I love” (Matthew 3:16, 17). In that moment recorded in Scripture, we have the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit all in one revelation.

During the first four hundred years of the early church, the church fathers wrestled with these affirmations. To give them order, they formulated this profound truth about God under the title of the Trinity (tri-unity, three-in-one).

They said, God is one in “being” and, at the same time, three in “persons.” We say God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. The three persons are God — coeternal, coequal and indivisible — and one in being.

We are to worship the one true God seeing at the same time both the unity of His being and His three persons. God the Father rules over all; God the Son is our incarnate Redeemer; God the Spirit is our Sanctifier. More broadly, the Holy Spirit is the executor of the Godhead in the world.

The hymn our congregation sang to conclude worship on a recent Sunday morning included the following words:

Laud and honor to the Father,
Laud and honor to the Son,
Laud and honor to the Spirit,
Ever Three and Ever One.

The historic church sings this 700-year-old hymn in praise to the one and only God who in three persons creates, redeems and sanctifies.

If this truth still mystifies, remember that it is in our worship of the God who is three-in-one that we come closest to grasping the reality of this great mystery of the Christian faith.

When we pray, “Our Father who art in Heaven” we are worshiping the one and only God. When we say of Jesus, “He is Lord and Savior,” we acknowledge the one and only God. When we entreat the Holy Spirit to empower us or intercede for us, we also appeal to the one and only God. One Godhead in three persons! Three persons in one Godhead!

All praise to the Eternal God — Father, Son and Holy Spirit!

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