I Believe the Resurrection!

Fra Angelico’s ‘Noli Me Tangere’ (c.1438–50), public domain.

To reflect on the resurrection of Jesus I like to read the account in the Gospel of John as he reports the first visits disciples made to the tomb where Jesus‘ body had been laid. This is reported in chapter 20.

First, I ponder what Mary Magdalene was doing there alone on that Sunday before sun-up in the deserted burial district outside Jerusalem. Why wasn’t she in solitude as other disciples were, almost in hiding, after the brutal death and hasty burial of the Lord?

She was probably drawn to his tomb by her great love for him, since he had given her life back to her by delivering her from demon possession. She was there seeking nearness, and to weep and grieve over her loss.

She did not expect to find the entrance to the tomb a gaping hole in the face of the rock. Its closure by the soldiers the day before should have been permanent. Historians tell us it would have taken great strength to roll back the stone in the groove at the mouth of the tomb.

A glimpse into the open tomb was all she needed in order for her to conclude that there could be only one explanation.

She ran to Peter and the other disciple (John, the one recording the account) to report. Panting from exertion, she said: “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb and we don’t know where they have put him!”

According to John, the two men ran to the site to verify her report. John outran Peter, and it is likely that Mary returned, though at a slower pace.

John arrived at the tomb first, but once there was less venturesome. Without entering he stooped down to peer into the gloomy interior. Impetuous Peter caught up to him and was the one who first entered.

There was no body. Mary’s assumption seemed correct. Unexpectedly, John saw the linen strips in which the body had been hurriedly wrapped for burial. They were lying on the stone shelf where the body had been placed in repose.

And, more remarkably, it was as though the body had sublimated out of the wraps, which collapsed in place, with the wrap from his head perfectly spaced and separated from the strips that had enclosed the body.

The writer tells us that John saw and believed. But what did he believe? Only that the body had been moved? Possibly so at first, since the Scriptures had not yet been opened to them clarifying the promise of Jesus’ resurrection. So the two men started back to their lodgings in the city.

After they had left Mary arrived back at the tomb. She stood weeping. Bending down to look inside this time, she saw two angels dressed in white sitting where Jesus had lain and they ask her why she is weeping.

Through her tears she answers that someone had robbed the tomb of the body of the Lord and she didn’t know where it had been placed. It was as though to say: I have unspent grief and am angry at such an indignity.

At that moment she turned around and saw a man standing there, but with vision blurred by her tears and grief, she does not know it is Jesus. He asks her the same question the two dressed in white had asked: Why are you weeping?

She assumes it is the gardener and, perhaps again indignantly, asks the location of Jesus’ body so she can see that it is properly cared for.

Jesus speaks her name, … Mary … In an instant she recognizes him and utters in a burst of joy: Rabboni! Teacher! She is obviously the first of his followers to witness the Lord as resurrected.

I review this particular account to refresh my faith and give life to Jesus’ promise elsewhere made: Because I live, you too shall live (John 14:19).

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