How to Cultivate a Christian Mind II

In a loving pastoral letter to the Philippian congregation the Apostle Paul recommends eight words that describe what should be the content of a healthy Christian mind:

Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable — if anything is excellent or praiseworthy — think about such things. (Philippians 4:8)

Last week, I dealt with the first three: true, noble, and right. In this blog I deal only with pure. In essence, set your mind on what is pure. 

I asked my wife what the word “pure” brought to mind. After a few moments she responded: a drink of cold water from a swiftly flowing stream high on a mountain, a newborn baby, or an object of gold purged of all foreign matter.

Not many things in our world can be called pure. Some psychiatrists tell us that pure motives are never possible, even for Christians. For example, we may contemplate doing some great kindness to someone in need but lurking in the shadows of our mind may be a twinge of pride in our intentions. The human mind is tricky.

Because we are fallen creatures and have failed many times we might be tempted to brush aside purity of motivation as a fool’s errand. Yet we have the unqualified word of our Lord, telling us a pure heart should be a goal.

He said, Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God (Matthew 5:8). And the Apostle Paul includes the call to think on whatever is pure in his bouquet of good things to ponder as quoted above.

Even in Old Testament times, when the Prophet Nathan faced King David with his sin against Bathsheba, first David prayed: Cleanse me with hyssop, and I will be clean (Psalm 51:7a). Using the imagery of the temple, he acknowledged that sin brings defilement and must be cleansed.

He then prayed: Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me (51:10). This suggests divine enablement. We exercise faith and are not left to do it on our own.

And we learn equally directly in the New Testament that inner cleansing for believers is an ongoing need. The writer of Hebrews says: Let us draw near to God with a sincere heart and with the full assurance that faith brings, having our hearts sprinkled to cleanse us from a guilty conscience and having our bodies washed with pure water (Hebrews 10:22).

In our profoundly defiled world our Lord wants to raise up an army of Christian men and women who take seriously the call to purity of thought and action. Here are three suggestions to help in the struggle.

First, we can recall and reaffirm daily such scriptural fragments as …not I but Christ, not I but Christ, not I but Christ… (Galatians 2:20). We can carry such fragments of truth anywhere. Another is, …except you are born of water and the Spirit… (John 3:5). In the latter case it is the Holy Spirit in us who gives us the energy to resist our world’s many impure attractions.

Second, we can conduct a thorough inventory and house cleaning of what is not pure in what we listen to and what we read. We may well be faced with wrenching decisions about friends who intentionally would take us in wrong directions.

I remember a large youth gathering where the young people were moved by the Holy Spirit to commit their lives fully to Christ. One of the results of their response to that moving of the Spirit was a massive surrender of impure objects and behaviors.

Finally, once cleansed, we can make use regularly of two instructions of the Apostle John: (1) No one who lives in him keeps on sinning. No one who continues to sin has either seen him or known him (1 John 3:6). That is, the power of habitual sin must be broken and God is able to deliver us. Also, (2) If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness (1:9).

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Photo credit: Takahiro Kyono (via flickr.com)

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