How to Cultivate a Christian Mind

The human mind is a vital component of our uniqueness among God’s creatures. Even so, because of the fall of mankind, our minds are damaged and need redemption plus ongoing enrichment.

The Apostle Paul deals with this need for enrichment. He points out that, after we become Christians — that is, after we are justified and made new creatures in Christ, we need the enrichment of the Christian mind.

In a loving pastoral letter he sets before the Philippian congregation eight key words to focus the process of refreshment that their minds needed — and our minds need.

Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable — if anything is excellent or praiseworthy — think about such things. (Philippians 4:8)

I intend to comment on the first three words in this blog, and deal with the remainder next week. 

Think on whatever is true. Our God is the very essence of truth (Numbers 23:19); grace and truth came by Jesus Christ (John 1:17); as well, the Holy Spirit is the Spirit of truth (John 16:13). Truth should therefore be a foremost issue in all our thoughts and communications. God’s truth is like the North Star to the mariner; it will guide us through every dark night and eventually bring us safely to the harbor.

For example, the Bible claims to speak God’s truth when it considers marriage to be the union of one man and one woman for life. From the perspective of divine truth this is not negotiable. The Bible challenges us to test these and all other truth issues by the words of our Lord Jesus. He is The Truth (Matthew 19:3-12).

Think on whatever is noble or honorable. That is, whatever is elevating, or worthy of respect. We are to train our God-redeemed minds to sort the noble from the ignoble in all our dealings and to come down on the side of whatever is noble or honorable.

Jesus is our best example. He saw worth in little children in a way the disciples did not and he demonstrated it. He honored the dignity of the deaf, not putting them outside his concern because of their affliction. Even lepers, who were shunned by everyone at that time, got fair and compassionate treatment from him because disease did not hide from him their worth.

Think on whatever is right. The word “right” is from the same root as the word “righteousness.” This in turn conveys the sense of obedience to God’s law. No one except our Lord Jesus himself has met the requirements of God’s law perfectly. We joyfully profess that God made him who had no sin to be sin for us that in him we might become the righteousness of God (2 Corinthians 5:21). He and he alone is the Lord, our righteousness (Jeremiah 23:6).

The Apostle Paul reflects how that marvellous gift of righteousness should affect our characters when he writes to the Corinthian church regarding a misunderstanding: For we are taking pains to do what is right, not only in the eyes of the Lord but also in the eyes of man (2 Corinthians 8:21).

When it comes to righteousness we more often think of “doing” what is right than of “thinking” what is right. But our doing what is right begins with our thinking what is right. In this precious passage in Philippians the Apostle gives us guidance: Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is just. Here is a good start.

CONTINUED NEXT WEEK

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Photo credit: Surya Teja (via flickr.com)

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