Christian Meditation Makes For Healthy Christian Living

Say to someone, “A penny for your thoughts” and that person may surprise you with a flow of content being pondered even as you speak.

Our minds are never blank. They are either thinking, pondering, worrying, rehearsing, plotting, or aimlessly drifting. Our minds host a rapid flow of thoughts and sensations we are not always aware of.

Imagine your mind as a television set left to play all day long. During the day your inner set may drift from your upcoming doctor’s appointment, to your problem with a stubborn child, to getting the car serviced, to an argument with a fellow employee.

As for the TV you suddenly remember that the “remote” is within your reach. This analogy between TV and our minds can point out to Christians that what is in our heads is sometimes good, sometimes not so good, and always there because we allow it.

For example:  One man in love may rehearse in his mind every detail of an intended  proposal for marriage while someone across town may be strategizing every detail of a bank robbery. For both, all begins in the mind.

J.I. Packer, in calling for our disciplined use of the Christian mind, signals us to engage more in meditation. He says meditation is the activity of calling to mind, and thinking over, and dwelling on, and applying to oneself the various things that one knows about the works and ways and purposes and promises of Christian truth.

The ingredients for meditation can be diverse: Portions from the Gospel accounts are always at hand. Or one may call up the rich lines of a favorite hymn, or a timeless psalm like Psalms 23 or 91, or the central point of a recent sermon.

Consider the testimony of an elderly man in Scotland. On Sunday mornings he walked the most direct route to church but after service he took the longest way home because he wanted to be alone to meditate on the sermon he had just heard.

Or consider the example of Jesus. Nowhere does the Gospel say he meditated as a separate aspect of his communion with the Father, but it is clear that his mind was actively attuned to the Father even when the devil was tempting him to take shortcuts to the fulfilling of his life’s mission (Matthew 4:1-11).

It’s a Christian practice. The Psalms call us to meditate at least 11 times. For example, the very first Psalm describes the person who is blessed of God as follows:

But his delight is in the law of the Lord, and on his law he meditates day and night. “The law of the Lord”; there’s a cue for the content of our self-directed thinking. That divine law tells us what God is like and what he wants of us. We are to meditate by turning the truth of his law over in our minds, saying it to ourselves, rehearsing it, for example, either in the quietness of our room first thing in the morning or on the way to school or work.

The Bible gives us other rich resources. The Apostle Paul wrote the Philippian Christians a broad menu for meditation that could serve our purposes well. He wrote, Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable — if anything is excellent or praiseworthy — think about such things (Philippians 4:8).

Excellent or praiseworthy! This is an exhortation to set the standards of our thought life intentionally. Here the Apostle Paul gives us a bead on abundant material for the life of the Christian mind. If we take his cue seriously we will enrich both our minds and in doing so, our relationships too.

Photo credit: Thomas Leuthard (via flickr.com)

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2 thoughts on “Christian Meditation Makes For Healthy Christian Living

  1. Bishop Bastion… Pastor, This is precisely the word the Lord wanted me to meditate upon this morning. I am confident that He is using your ministry powerfully all over the world. Thanks for your love and obedience.

    Best, Norm Hall

    Sent from Norm Hall’s iPhone President, Simpson University Email: nhall@simpsonu.edu Phone: 530-226-4130 Pursue Shalom

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